Whose jeans do you want to find on your bedroom floor? We quizzed some of our favourite celebs on some dirty denim related matters...

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Shock horror! At the Jeans For Genes Day launch party we got some of our favourite celebs to dish the dirt on some devilish denim-related matters.

Ahem… Like, whose jeans do you want to find on your bedroom floor and whose trews do you want to get into? Come on, you can’t blame us…

Harry Styles better watch out! Neon Jungle singer Asami
Zdrenka
says she wants to get into the One Direction heartthrob’s jeans.
They were linked last year when they met at The Brit Awards and since then she’s been gushing about him.

Come on guys, make it happen! Meanwhile, check out which celeb wants to get into CBB star Dappy‘s jeans for some very rude reasons.

You’ve got to watch our hilarious video here

We were at the star-studded launch of the charity Jeans for Genes Day party at the glamorous Chinawhite nightclub in London and spotted loads of celebs including Warwick Davies, Cheska Hull (Made in Chelsea), Kate Garraway, Neon Jungle, Danny Jones from McBusted, Casey Batchelor and charity spokespeople Adam Pearson and Tom Staniford.

Celebrity ambassadors for the charity include Coronation Street‘s Kym Marsh and Catherine Tyldesley, reality television stars Louise Thompson, Sam Faiers, Ferne McCann, Caggie Dunlop and Kimberley Garner, Olympic gymnast Louis Smith, footballer Fabrice Muamba, actress Gemma Merna, Coleen Rooney and Katie Price.

Jeans For Genes Day is on 19 September and raises money for Genetic Disorders UK, the charity that aims to transform the lives of children with genetic disorders.

Funds raised will go to the vital care and support they urgently need. One in 25 children in the UK are born with a genetic disorder – that’s more than 30,000 babies each year.

In 2014, 25 charities will benefit from the funds raised on Jeans For Genes Day. To see the impact your jeans can have and to help raise money for this amazing cause, order a free fundraising kit here www.jeansforgenes.org or call 0800 980 4800.