Piers Morgan has slammed the show

Piers Morgan has never been a fan of Love Island, but now he’s waded into the debate that Maura Higgins should be booted off the show after Ofcom receive 486 complaints over her ‘predatory’ behaviour.

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Today it’s been revealed that Ofcom – the broadcasting regulator – received 486 complaints after Maura attempted to kiss Tommy Fury without his consent last week.

The Irish stunner straddled him on the sofa and tried to plant a kiss on his lips, while he reluctantly offered her his cheek.

Viewers flocked in their droves to brand the scenes ‘uncomfortable’ on Twitter and it turns out nearly 500 of those viewers were so offended by Maura’s behaviour that they wrote an official complaint.

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While Piers told those who complain to Ofcom to ‘get a life,’ he did rant about the issue on Good Morning Britain and branded Maura’s behaviour ‘predatory’.

‘What part of no means no did Tommy not communicate there,’ he said. ‘If it was a bloke she’d be out of there, she’d be arrested, career ruined. No means no. Tommy looked like a victim to me.

‘The whole point is that Maura is predatory.’

It comes after former contestant, Sherif Lanre, called the show out for double standards after he was axed for accidentally kicking Molly-Mae in the groin during a play fight and using vulgar language.

Sherif – who ‘mutually agreed’ with producers to leave the villa following the incident – said: ‘There was one guy, who I will not name, who repeatedly used the N-word as he rapped in front of me.

‘He said it two or three times and he was not pulled aside even though the code forbids racist language.

‘The same rules did not seem to apply to the other contestants.’

love island

Love Island bosses denied the claims, saying: ‘We monitor the islanders 24/7 and we have no recording of the use of this offensive language.

‘And, at no point, does anyone use that offensive language in rap lyrics or any other time. We do have clear rules on the use of language in the villa.’